Department of Health’s Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline Empowers Residents to Quit During The Great American Smokeout

HONOLULU – November 17, 2016 – The Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline today joins partner organizations across the state encouraging residents to take part in the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout (GASO), a day that challenges current smokers to stop using tobacco and helps people learn about the many tools available to help them quit.

Community Partners

The annual GASO event coincides this year with the Hawai’i Department of Health’s celebration of the 10-year anniversary of the state’s landmark Clean Indoor Air Act and accomplishments in tobacco prevention since its passage in 2006.

“Through the collective efforts of the Hawai’i State Department of Health, our community partners and programs like the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline, the smoking rate among island residents has dropped 17 percent in just ten years,” said Lola H. Irvin, Administrator of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division at the Hawai’i Department of Health. “Tobacco use remains a top public health priority in our state, and we are proud that the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline allows information and tools to be put into the hands of the smokers who need the services most.”

During the press conference, a documentary was shown celebrating the 10-year anniversary of the Clean Air law, featuring Hawaii’s accomplishments in tobacco prevention, and highlighting the Quitline’s efforts in creating a smoke free Hawaii. Watch the documentary below:

With more than 90,000 calls since its inception, the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline continues to provide free resources and professional support for those who are interested in quitting smoking during the GASO event. The Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline empowers Hawai’i residents to make the change by offering access to free telephone or web-based counseling options and approved nicotine replacement therapy treatments.

Current smokers, family members and friends of tobacco users, and health care providers are invited to call the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline on GASO to learn more and join the thousands of island residents who enjoy the benefits of a smoke free lifestyle. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW, or visit hawaiiquitline.org for your FREE personalized quit plan, FREE nicotine replacement patches, gum, or lozenges, and to gain access to interactive tracking tools and educational materials available 24/7.

For facts about tobacco use and the motivation to stay quit, follow the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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About the Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline and the Hawai’i Tobacco Prevention and Control Trust Fund
The Hawai’i Tobacco Quitline is funded by the Hawai’i Tobacco Prevention and Control Trust Fund. The trust fund’s dollars represent a portion of Hawai’i’s Master Settlement Agreement payments resulting from a joint lawsuit against the four biggest U.S. tobacco companies to recover healthcare costs for treatment of tobacco-related illnesses paid for by taxpayers. The Hawai’i Tobacco Prevention and Control Trust Fund provides resources for community organizations to create and maintain a Hawai’i that is free from tobacco use, addiction and exposure to secondhand smoke.

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The Hawaii Tobacco Quitline Launches New Campaign for New Years

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