Why Quit

We all know tobacco use is harmful. Discover why quitting today benefits your life well into the future.

At the Hawai‘i Tobacco Quitline, we’ll provide you with the tools and knowledge to identify your triggers to help you quit tobacco and realize the healthy life you deserve.

Health Benefits

Cigarettes contain thousands of chemicals include at least 69 known carcinogens.1

Over 40,000 adult nonsmokers die each year from exposure to secondhand smoke.2

Pets (and children) could find discarded cigarette butts and decide to eat them. Toxic signs seen from tobacco ingestion include vomiting, tremors, seizures, and even death.3

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. 2014.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. 2014.
  3. VeterinaryPartner.com. Nicotine Poisoning in Pets. Wendy C. Brooks, DVM, DipABVP. 2015.

Financial Benefits

A pack-a-day smoker spends $3,285 per year in cigarettes alone.1

Of all healthcare spending in the U.S., about 7-9% is for illnesses caused by tobacco smoke.2

Smoking in a home reduces the resale value by about 20 percent, on average.3

  1. Bernado, Richie The Real Cost of Smoking by State. https://wallethub.com/edu/the-financial-cost-of-smoking-by-state/9520/. January 17, 2017. Accessed 8/22/2017.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. 2014.
  3. The Canadian Press. Smoking Reduces House Value by 30%, realtor survey suggests. http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/smoking-reduces-house-value-by-30-realtor-survey-suggests-1.1310426. April 16, 2013. Accessed 8/22/2017.

Lifestyle Benefits

Studies show smokers remain unemployed longer and, when hired, earn substantially less (on average $5 less an hour) than those who don’t smoke.1

Less than 14% of people in Hawai‘i smoke, and many prefer to date a non-smoker.2

Those who smoke have less endurance, reduced physical performance and higher risk of injuries than nonsmokers.2

  1. Prochaska JJ, Michalek AK, Brown-Johnson C, Daza EJ, Baiocchi M, Anzai N, Rogers A, Grigg M, Chieng A. Likelihood of Unemployed Smokers vs Nonsmokers Attaining Reemployment in a One-Year Observational Study. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(5):662-670. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0772.
  2. Hawai‘i State Department of Health. Tobacco Control Strategic Plan, 2016-2020. Honolulu, HI: Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division, Tobacco Prevention and Education Program. 2016.
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